Presented by VII Interactive
Words and Pictures: The Art of Writing Project Statements and Grant Proposals

Workshop in Online — August 5, 2020 until August 7, 2020

The VII Academy is pro­vid­ing two schol­ar­ships for stu­dents to attend this three-part work­shop, which is for any pho­tog­ra­ph­er who wants to learn how to write bet­ter grant pro­pos­als to sup­port per­son­al work and long term projects.

Instructors

Sara Terry

Duration

Three 90-Minute Sessions (August 5th, 6th, 7th, 2020 from 1PM EDT – 2:30PM EDT)

Class size

8

Skill level

Professionals, Semi-Professionals, Intermediate, Advanced

Eligibility

Photojournalists who are cit­i­zens and res­i­dents of non-G20 coun­tries are wel­come to apply.

Apply until

July 20, 2020

Languages: This pro­gram will be con­duct­ed in English

Submissions until: July 20, 2020.

 

Liliesleaf Farm, Johannesburg, Gauteng from the chapter "Landscapes from Nelson Mandela's South Africa" of the book "Forgiveness and Conflict: Lessons From Africa." In the early 1960s, Liliesleaf Farm was secretly used by members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, who lived at the farm under the assumed name of David Motsamayi, as a worker in blue overalls employed by the owner to look after the farm.* ©Sara Terry / VII
Liliesleaf Farm, Johannesburg, Gauteng from the chap­ter “Landscapes from Nelson Mandela’s South Africa” of the book “Forgiveness and Conflict: Lessons From Africa.” In the ear­ly 1960s, Liliesleaf Farm was secret­ly used by mem­bers of the ANC, includ­ing Nelson Mandela, who lived at the farm under the assumed name of David Motsamayi, as a work­er in blue over­alls employed by the own­er to look after the farm.* ©Sara Terry / VII

DESCRIPTION

In the first of three 90-minute ses­sions, doc­u­men­tary pho­tog­ra­ph­er and film­mak­er Sara Terry will explain what makes a strong pro­pos­al, includ­ing writ­ing tips and how to sequence pho­tos, share resources on grants and grant writ­ing and give insights into fun­ders’ think­ing from her per­spec­tive as a fun­der with her non-profit, The Aftermath Project. The sec­ond ses­sion includes a writ­ing exer­cise dur­ing class, which stu­dents will share and dis­cuss. During the third 90-minute ses­sion, each stu­dent will receive per­son­al feed­back on their project state­ments and on how to sequence their pho­tos for a grant pro­pos­al, as well as sug­ges­tions (when applic­a­ble) for grants to apply for.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

PLEASE NOTE: In the attach­ments sec­tion of the appli­ca­tion, there are spe­cial instruc­tions that appli­cants for this schol­ar­ship should please pro­vide a project state­ment and 20 images that you would like Sara (on the course) to review.

 

INSTRUCTOR

Sara Terry

SARA TERRY

Apply Now

SCHOLARSHIPS

Eligible appli­cants who wish to be con­sid­ered for a VII Academy schol­ar­ship to attend this pro­gram should click on the but­ton below. You must first reg­is­ter on Awardforce, then cre­ate an entry for this work­shop by choos­ing “VII Interactive” and then the name of this work­shop.

Enroll now

For those who wish to guar­an­tee them­selves a spot, you can par­tic­i­pate through a paid place­ment via the VII Interactive web­site.

Image detail

*Full cap­tion for lead image above: Liliesleaf Farm, Johannesburg, Gauteng. In the ear­ly 1960s, Liliesleaf Farm was secret­ly used by mem­bers of the ANC, includ­ing Nelson Mandela, who lived at the farm under the assumed name of David Motsamayi, as a work­er in blue over­alls employed by the own­er to look after the farm. In a crush­ing blow for the ANC and its armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe, South African secu­ri­ty forces raid­ed the farm on July 11, 1963, cap­tur­ing 19 mem­bers of the under­ground as they were meet­ing to plan attacks on the gov­ern­ment. The raid led to the Rivonia Trial (named after the neigh­bor­hood in which Liliesleaf stands), in which 10 lead­ers of the ANC were tried for 221 acts of sab­o­tage, which the gov­ern­ment said were designed to “foment vio­lent rev­o­lu­tion.” Mandela was among those sen­tenced to life in prison; he was sent to Robben Island, where he served 18 of his 27 years in cap­tiv­i­ty. Today, the farm is a nation­al muse­um, ded­i­cat­ed to keep­ing aware­ness of the ear­ly lib­er­a­tion strug­gle alive.

I’d often used the South African word ubun­tu as I talked about this project over the years. I leaned heav­i­ly on its rich mean­ing (which loose­ly trans­lates as “because you are, I am”) to explain the human inter­con­nect­ed­ness I found root­ed in the tra­di­tions of truth-telling and for­give­ness that I was explor­ing. But when I arrived in the coun­try in May 2013, I was unsure of how to begin.

I lis­tened to what South Africans, black and white, had to say about how far their coun­try had – and hadn’t – come over the past near­ly 20 years of democ­ra­cy. Most every­one said that rec­on­cil­i­a­tion was still an elu­sive goal, one that might belong to the “born free” gen­er­a­tion, the youth born after the fall of apartheid.

“We have a long way to go in our atti­tudes towards one anoth­er,” a black taxi dri­ver told me. “It will be some time before we are tru­ly a rain­bow nation. We have to rec­on­cile in our dai­ly lives. You can­not leave that to the TRC. That was an insti­tu­tion for a lim­it­ed time.”

You might like