The William Gross and Jennifer Stengaard Gross Scholarship

Written on August 5, 2020, posted in News

From the project, "Mother Died and Time Passed." ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo

October 2020 - July, 2022

Since last year the VII Academy has pro­vid­ed The William Gross and Jennifer Stengaard Gross Scholarship for a high-achieving pho­tog­ra­ph­er from the major­i­ty world to attend the MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at the London College of Communication (LCC, University of London Arts). The first schol­ar­ship for the aca­d­e­m­ic years run­ning from October 2019 to July 2021 was grant­ed to Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo, an out­stand­ing pho­tog­ra­ph­er from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Photographers can apply until September 11th, 2020 for this year’s schol­ar­ship.

Scholarship win­ner Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo defines him­self as an artist and image mak­er who likes to com­bine pho­tog­ra­phy, col­lage and paint­ing. After grad­u­at­ing with a Bachelor of Business Administration, Turjo attend­ed a 3-year pho­tog­ra­phy pro­gram at the Pathshala South Asian Media Institute in Dhaka, and then stud­ied pho­tog­ra­phy at the Danish School of Media and Journalism (DMJX) thanks to the 2019 Shahidul Alam Grant, a schol­ar­ship fund­ed by the VII Academy. Eight months into this two-year pro­gram, Turjo shares with us some of his expe­ri­ence as a VII Academy schol­ar of the MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography. The course is deliv­ered entire­ly online pre­dom­i­nant­ly through live web con­fer­enc­ing.

‘‘It was Sarkar Protick, my teacher and men­tor at Pathshala, who first intro­duced me to this schol­ar­ship oppor­tu­ni­ty at the University of London Arts. The appli­ca­tion process was sim­ple although quite time con­sum­ing. The key require­ments were a port­fo­lio of my work, a pro­pos­al for a project study, a moti­va­tion let­ter and a ref­er­ence let­ter. The most com­plex and demand­ing part of the process was the study pro­pos­al: I had to pro­vide the lay­out of the final project I’d pro­pose to work on in the Masters pro­gram, if select­ed. This had to be an impor­tant project, which had to remain rel­e­vant two years from the moment I sub­mit­ted my appli­ca­tion. This study pro­pos­al did require a lot of research and moti­va­tion! I’ve been attend­ing the Masters pro­gram for a semes­ter now, and it has clear­ly taught me how to devel­op visu­als through exten­sive research. I’ve also learnt to devel­op short-term jour­nal­is­tic projects, which were entire­ly new to me. One of the cours­es I’ve par­tic­u­lar­ly liked this first semes­ter is the Rethink course, for which we’ve had to re-work on our own projects with a com­plete­ly fresh angle. I’ve also found the assign­ments giv­en with­in the History course very help­ful: we’ve had to research books, news­pa­per, arti­cles, etc. on a top­ic of our choice, then dis­cuss our research in class and final­ly devel­op our own arti­cle.

We have guests lec­tures every Wednesdays: these are very inter­est­ing because the artists often dis­cuss their own per­son­al jour­neys. I par­tic­u­lar­ly enjoyed Max Pinckers, Sohrab Hura, and Chloe Dewe Mathews. In terms of team work, I just start­ed attend­ing the Collaborative Unit - I’ll tell you more in a cou­ple of months! I am attend­ing all cours­es online and my class­mates and teach­ers keep me updat­ed through email. They’ve all been very help­ful and we stay con­nect­ed through social media groups. Some of them have shown inter­est in vis­it­ing me in Bangladesh–I real­ly hope we’ll make this hap­pen or that I get a chance to vis­it them. I have been in lock­down at home for two months because of the COVID-19 pan­dem­ic. Luckily, this hasn’t impact­ed my stud­ies too much as I’m cur­rent­ly work­ing on a Rethink assign­ment which I can eas­i­ly doc­u­ment from home. In the next semes­ter pro­gram, I’m look­ing for­ward to learn­ing how to devel­op a long-term project and how to reach an audi­ence. I real­ly love long-term projects and I know I’ll con­tin­ue these even after grad­u­at­ing. I’m also hap­py to share with my stu­dents at Pathshala all the knowl­edge and expe­ri­ence I gath­er from LCC.”

”Last semes­ter I pol­ished and edit­ed one of the main works I had been work­ing on since 2017, called Mother Died and Time Passed (see the gallery below). Before join­ing the MA pro­gram I approached pho­tog­ra­phy most­ly through its prac­ti­cal side. The Photojournalism Practice course taught me the the­o­ret­i­cal and research aspects of visu­al nar­ra­tives, enabling me to see the gaps in my ini­tial project, and iden­ti­fy the oppor­tu­ni­ty to add depth and lay­ers.”

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

  • Rohingyas: pos­si­bly the world’s largest state­less pop­u­la­tion. Almost a mil­lion Rohingyas have sought refuge in Bangladesh, flee­ing per­se­cu­tion and unimag­in­able suf­fer­ing in their own coun­try (Myanmar). In Bangladesh, they have found shel­ter in a few refugee camps in the Teknaf area. The biggest one of these camps is Kutupalong locat­ed in Ukhiya. I have been work­ing in Ukhiya for more than two years. I wit­nessed how a per­son los­es her iden­ti­ty and gets reduced to just anoth­er num­ber. The ID cards that had been issued by the Burmese mil­i­tary to some of these peo­ple some 20 years ago fas­ci­nat­ed me. All Rohingyas were sup­posed to get one of these cards, but this promise nev­er mate­ri­al­ized. The ID card had decayed over the years. Paper weath­ered; ink fad­ed. It appears that the iden­ti­ty of the Rohingya has fad­ed with them too. This ID card became my key image and I start­ed mak­ing por­traits. In every por­trait, I keep a white back­ground and take a long expo­sure pho­to­graph using flash on both the per­son and the back­ground to recre­ate or give a sense of that ID card which shows loss of details. The images have been tak­en with a dig­i­tal cam­era. Later on, I make neg­a­tives on nor­mal A4 papers and make a con­tact print in the dark­room. It is then scanned again. In the entire process, there is a loss of detail at every step. This is done inten­tion­al­ly, as I am talk­ing about the fad­ed iden­ti­ty of a for­got­ten com­mu­ni­ty. My tech­niques and the aes­thet­ics of images should rep­re­sent the same. Meanwhile, the num­ber of refugees in the Bangladeshi camps grows. All at once, these peo­ple became home­less, lost their land and iden­ti­ty. In gen­er­al, they are Rohingya. A vast num­ber of them, this num­ber spans. Moreover, they remain in a large num­ber with no iden­ti­ty. ©Mushfiq Mahbub Turjo.

On top of fol­low­ing this demand­ing Masters cur­ricu­lum, Turjo is also busy work­ing as a teacher at Pathshala. See more of Turjo’s work and awards on his web­site. To be eli­gi­ble for The William Gross and Jennifer Stengaard Gross Scholarship, you must be accept­ed on the MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Part Time/ Online Mode) at the London College of Communication, UAL, start­ing in October 2020. Please see this web­page for full details and  this pdf on how to apply.